Vol. 1 – Do I Have Rope Descent Anchorages and What Does that Mean for Me?

When an organization takes ownership of a building, they also take on the responsibility for protecting workers who will inspect and maintain the facility. Many building owners hope to transfer that liability to the contractors they hire, but it cannot be fully avoided. In some cases, OSHA specifically places responsibility on the building owner. Rope […]

Vol. 2 – Is Anchorage Load Testing Doing More Harm than Good?

Because of the new OSHA regulation language on rope descent anchorages, which we covered in our last blog post, many facility owners are heavily investing in designing, installing, inspecting and testing anchorages. Too often, though, the resources spent do nothing more than provide a false sense of security—or worse, cause more harm than good. It is […]

Vol. 3 – If Load Testing Isn’t the Answer, What Is?

As mentioned in the previous blog post in this series, load testing without analysis is not a reliable way to determine anchorage strength. To avoid damage and unnecessary expense, anchorage strength should be predicted using analytical methods. When workmanship cannot be verified visually, such as with adhesive anchors, then nondestructive testing may be appropriate. But relying […]

Vol. 4 – The Value of a Qualified Person

As explained in the previous blog posts in this series, the evaluation of rope descent anchorages can be incredibly complex—and potentially very damaging. However, that doesn’t change the fact that OSHA still requires building owners to provide the assurance that their anchorages are fit for use. When deciding how to move forward, it is critical […]

Vol. 5 – Spend Wisely on Anchorages to Truly Improve Safety & Manage Risk

To conclude this blog series, we want to provide a specific recommendation for how to not only comply with OSHA’s regulations, but also increase safety and manage risk for your organization. Simply put: You cannot comply with one line of the OSHA regulation and think your systems are safe. Consider this: When you prepare to […]